Ferries at the dock

This shot of ferries pulling into the Lopez Island ferry dock I took last night is rather analogous of my workload at the moment. Not a bad thing, but it does put blog updates somewhat lower on the priority poll.

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Arts and stuffs and things

And thus ends (finally) a very intense week. I’m still not clear on everything, but I do recall there were two book covers, three game cards, a logo, a lot of other art, a lot of coffee, a lot of food, a bunch of friends, a two ton beach log that absolutely had to be moved, geese and cake, wine, plum wine, tequilla, street art, and some cows in there someplace — one of which I’m absolutely positive was named “Steak.”

Meanwhile, everyone is having fun over at Spectrum Live. Punks.

Anyway, on to arts and stuffs and things …   Image

I don’t remember which one is Steak. I think he’s on the left.

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Bansky-esque street art in Eastsound, WA.

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Now I just need someone to help me drink these …

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Jack.

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Just say “Uncle.”

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Life Drawing

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Life Drawing II

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Cover I finished this past week. Video process coming soon.

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And in closing, a Reddit find – Jellyfish on the beach.

“Please don’t go. We’ll eat you up, we love you so!”

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I was surprised at how much the news struck me. Maurice Sendak has never played a huge role for me in terms of influences. Don’t get me wrong, I have always loved his work, but it wasn’t something that I ever intentionally set out to emulate, or even tried to. To be honest, I didn’t think of him much or very often, but did enjoy reading or seeing the odd interview with him when it popped up. But he wasn’t someone that I spent a lot of time on.

So, upon hearing of his death this morning I was surprised at how much it reverberated. I felt like I had lost a friend I hadn’t seen in a long, long time, who’s last letter was around … someplace … amid the piles of books and other day to day detritus of life. But one that I desperately want to read to remind me of what a fantastic soul he was.

I related to Max as a kid. I was all over the place with an imagination that wouldn’t quit. Still hasn’t many years later. For Max, dealing with the pressures of childhood, his imagination was his escape, and so it is for me with being an adult. The movie, which Sendak had a hand in, expanded this into a larger world of displacement, alienation, loss and of finding one’s place in a world that often feels much larger than we are.

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As a child, The Wild Things scared me. I didn’t know what they were. They were … well, wild. Something different than I had seen before in my suburban up bringing. But Max stood up to them, and became their king. It was only as an adult that I realized that they were a metaphor for life, and how frightening and confusing it can be at times — but also how crazy fun it can be.

And then, still later, I found out that they were based on Sendaks Jewish relatives – his aunts and uncles who were, for him, these larger than life people who he didn’t always understand but who loved him none-the-less.

At the end of the story, Max found his way home to his mother and his dinner, love and acceptance. But he will forever remain the King of the Wild Things.

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“Please don’t go. We’ll eat you up, we love you so!”

From NPR’s Fresh Air interview